What Is Ocular Hypertension? Signs, Causes And Diagnosis


Last Updated: January 12, 2023, 19:23 IST

It’s crucial to have routine eye checkups, where your eye pressure is measured.

Glaucoma and other eye diseases can be brought on by Ocular Hypertension.

The surface of our eyeballs are filled with a fluid called aqueous humor. It is possible for pressure to accumulate inside your eyes when these liquids don’t get drained adequately. Ocular Hypertension is a condition in which your eyes have a higher-than-normal pressure. Glaucoma and other eye diseases can be brought on by Ocular Hypertension. Therefore, it’s crucial to have routine eye checkups, where your eye pressure is measured. Read on further to know about the causes and treatments of ocular hypertension.

Ocular Hypertension

Ocular Hypertension is a condition in which there are excessive intraocular pressure levels, but no outward symptoms of glaucomatous damage. Affected eyes can be either one or both. When a person has intraocular hypertension, it means:

There are no clinical glaucoma symptoms, such as optic nerve damage or a narrowed field of vision, yet intraocular pressure is continuously higher than 21 mmHg. This kind of eye hypertension can harm the visual nerve, therefore having high eye pressure may make you more susceptible to glaucoma. But Ocular Hypertension does not always result in glaucoma.

Causes

Our eyes generate aqueous humour, which needs to drain. By preventing the aqueous humour from congealing, this drainage system supports the maintenance of eye pressure. If the drainage system does not work properly, then Ocular Hypertension may result from the increased pressure inside the eye.

Symptoms

Usually, Ocular Hypertension has no symptoms. It is frequently present without the sufferer being aware of it. This is only one of the key benefits of routine eye checkups, as one of the tests your eye doctor will conduct during a standard checkup is measuring your eye pressure.

Diagnosis

Intraocular pressure is measured by your eye doctor using Tonometry. Your eye doctor should look for any glaucoma symptoms. This may entail testing your peripheral vision, as well as the optic nerve.

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